Jami Saloman, PhD

 

Jami Saloman

PhD – University of Maryland (2012)
B.A. – Boston University (2006)

Office: E1457 BSTWR
200 Lothrop Street,
Pittsburgh, PA 15261

Phone: 412-648-9568
Fax: 412-648-1441
E-mail: jls354@pitt.edu

Research Interests:

Although my undergraduate research explored language perception in human subjects, my training has been largely in the fields of basic neuroscience and pain neurobiology. My graduate training focused on channel-channel and channel-receptor interactions involved in the development of masseter hypersensitivity as well as analgesia. My current interests involve exploring how communication between neurons, immune cells, and their target organs not only regulate homeostasis but also how these interactions drive the development of pathophysiological states. My main research program employs a mouse model of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) to study the role of the nervous system in cancer, both with respect to pain and neurogenic inflammation as well as tumorigenesis itself. Our most recent studies focus on how denervation of the pancreas can slow or halt development of tumors. We are currently interested in elucidating the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of denervation. Toward this end, we are investigating whether denervation regulates the immune system, which is known to be dysregulated throughout PDAC progression.

Other research programs I am involved with explore normal function of sensory afferents and how afferent function changes with injury or inflammation. Toward this end, we have utilized anatomical, behavioral, optogenetic, chemogenetic, calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques to identify underlying mechanisms driving pain, neurogenic inflammation and cancer.

Publications:

Refereed articles

    1. Yeh CH, Bulas A, Moutal A, Saloman JL, Hartnett K, Anderson C, Tzounopoulos T, Sun D, Khanna R, Aizenman E. Targeting a potassium channel/syntaxin interaction ameliorates cell death in ischemic stroke. J Neurosci. 2017 May 8; Pubmed PMID: 28483976
    2. DeBerry JJ, Smith K, Saloman JL, Woodbury CJ, Davis BM. Profound Alteration in Cutaneous Primary Afferent Activity Produced by Inflammatory Mediators. Elife. 2016 Nov 2; 5:e20527. Pubmed PMID: 27805567.
    3. Saloman JL, Scheff NN, Snyder LM, Ross SE, Gold MS, Davis BM. Gi-DREADD Expression in Peripheral Nerves Produces Ligand-Dependent Analgesia, as well as Ligand-independent Functional Changes in Sensory Neurons. J Neurosci. 2016 Oct 19; 36(42): 0769-10781. Pubmed PMID: 27798132.
    4. Saloman JL, Albers KM, Hartmann DJ, Li D, Crawford HC, Muha EA, Rhim AD, Davis BM. Ablation of sensory neurons in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma slows initiation and progression of tumorigenesis. PNAS. 2016 Mar 15; 113(11): 3078-3083. Pubmed PMID: 26929329.
    5. Asgar J, Zhang Y, Saloman JL, Wang S, Chung MK, Ro JY. The role of TRPA1 in muscle pain and mechanical hyperalgesia under inflammatory conditions in rats. Neuroscience. 2015 Dec 3; 310: 206-215. Pubmed PMID: 26393428.
    6. DeBerry JJ, Saloman JL, Dragoo BK, Albers KA, Davis BM.  Artemin immunotherapy is effective in preventing and reversing cystitis-induced bladder hyperalgesia via TRPA1 regulation. J Pain. 2015 Jul; 16(7):638-636. Pubmed PMID: 25892657.
    7. Chung MK, Lee JS, Joseph J, Saloman JL, Ro JY. Peripheral Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation leads to muscle mechanical hyperalgesia through TRPV1 phosphorylation in the rat. J Pain. 2015 Jan; 16(1): 67-76. Pubmed PMID: 25451626.
    8. Saloman JL, Chung MK, Ro JY. P2X3 and TRPV1 functionally interact and mediate masseter sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons. Neuroscience. 2013 Mar 1; 232: 226–38. Pubmed PMID: 23201260.
    9. Lee JS, Saloman JL, Weiland G, Chung MK, Ro JY. Functional interactions between NMDA receptors and TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat masseter muscle. Pain. 2012 Jul; 153(7): 1514-24. Pubmed PMID: 22609428.
    10. Saloman JL, Niu KY, Ro JY. Activation of peripheral delta-opioid receptors leads to anti-hyperalgesic responses in the masseter muscle of male and female rats. Neuroscience. 2011 Sep 8; 190: 379-85. Pubmed PMID: 21664434.
    11. Niu K, Saloman JL, Zhang Y, Ro JY. Sex differences in the contribution of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in trigeminal ganglia under an acute muscle pain condition. Neuroscience. 2011 Apr 28; 180: 344-52. Pubmed PMID: 21296645.

Reviews and book chapters

  1. Saloman JL, Albers KM, Rhim AD, Davis BM. Can Stopping Nerves, Stop Cancer? Trends Neurosci. 2016 Dec; 39(12): 880-889. Pubmed PMID: 27832915.
  2. Saloman JL, Albers KM, Davis BM. “3.7 Neuroinflammation in acute pancreatitis.” The Pancreas: An Integrated Textbook of Basic Science, Medicine and Surgery, 3e, Ed. HG Beger et al. Wiley.